UMBC ebiquity
Bluetooth spy rocks replace pumpkins

Bluetooth spy rocks replace pumpkins

Tim Finin, 2:19pm 28 January 2006

Anand mentioned the (alleged) British spy rock as a good example of an advance that pervasive computing technology has wrought.

Russia’s state security service has accused British diplomats of spying in Moscow using electronic rocks. It’s an obvious hack, when you think about it — a bluetooth enabled PDA in a hollowed out rock could be used to drop off or pickup heavily encrypted documents from spys as they stroll by. The only problem would be power. Such a bluetooth rock would be much better than Alger Hiss’s pumpkin patch.

In an infamous spy case from the early days of the cold war, US State Department official Alger Hiss was accused (by a young Richard Nixon!) of passing documents via rolls of microfilm secreted in a hollowed-out pumpkin on his Maryland farm. But, technology marches on, with wireless rocks replacing pumpkins.

The March of Progress
1948
2006
In 1948 Alger Hiss was accused of transferring secrets using microfilm in a hollowed out pumpkin.
In 2006 the British were accused of transferring secrets using a wireless enabled PDA in a hollowed out rock.
cost: low
encryption: no
durability: low
models: Jack-o’-lantern, squash
vulnerable to: rodents, fungus, kids
pluses: organic, biodegradable
negatives: decay, rot
cost: medium
encryption: yes
durability: high
models: igneous, sedimentary
vulnerable to: bluejacking, spyware
pluses: tetris, plays mp3s
negatives: heavy

One Response to “Bluetooth spy rocks replace pumpkins”

  1. Smart Mobs Says:

    Smart rocks replace pumpkins

    The (alleged) British spy rock shows the advances wrought by pervasive computing technology. Russia’s state security service recently accused British diplomats of spying in Moscow using electronic rocks. It’s an obvious hack, when you think about it …