UMBC ebiquity
NRC study questions use of datamining for counterterrorism

NRC study questions use of datamining for counterterrorism

Tim Finin, 8:46pm 7 October 2008

The National Research Council released a report on the effectiveness of collecting and mining personal data, such as such as phone, medical, and travel records or Web sites visited, as a tool for combating terrorism. The report, titled Protecting Individual Privacy in the Struggle Against Terrorists: A Framework for Program Assessment, was produced by a multi-year study was carried out at the request of DHS and NSF.

The NRC’s press release on the study notes that routine datamining can help in “expanding and speeding traditional investigative work”, it questions the effectiveness of automated datamining and behavioral surveillance.

“Far more problematic are automated data-mining techniques that search databases for unusual patterns of activity not already known to be associated with terrorists, the report says. Although these methods have been useful in the private sector for spotting consumer fraud, they are less helpful for counterterrorism precisely because so little is known about what patterns indicate terrorist activity; as a result, they are likely to generate huge numbers of false leads. Such techniques might, however, have some value as secondary components of a counterterrorism system to assist human analysts. Actions such as arrest, search, or denial of rights should never be taken solely on the basis of an automated data-mining result, the report adds.
    The committee also examined behavioral surveillance techniques, which try to identify terrorists by observing behavior or measuring physiological states. There is no scientific consensus on whether these techniques are ready for use at all in counterterrorism, the report says; at most they should be used for preliminary screening, to identify those who merit follow-up investigation. Further, they have enormous potential for privacy violations because they will inevitably force targeted individuals to explain and justify their mental and emotional states.”

The report suggested criteria and questions addressing both the technical effectiveness as well as impact on privacy to help agencies and policymakers evaluate data-based counterterrorism programs. It also calls for oversight and both technical and policy safeguards to protect privacy and prevent “mission creep”. Declan McCullagh has a good summary of the key recommendations.

The 352 page report can be downloaded from the National Accademies Press site for $37.00.


Comments are closed.