UMBC ebiquity
2014 September

Archive for September, 2014

Infoboxer: using statistical semantic knowledge to help create Wikipedia infoboxes

September 29th, 2014, by Tim Finin, posted in OWL, RDF, Semantic Web, Web, Wikipedia


In this week’s ebiquity meeting (10am Tue. Oct 1 in ITE346), Varish Mulwad will present Infoboxer, a prototype tool he developed with Roberto Yus that overcomes these challenges using statistical and semantic knowledge from linked data sources to ease the process of creating Wikipedia infoboxes.

Wikipedia infoboxes serve as input in the creation of knowledge bases
such as DBpedia, Yago, and Freebase. Current creation of Wikipedia
infoboxes is manual and based on templates that are created and
maintained collaboratively. However, these templates pose several
challenges:

  • Different communities use different infobox templates for the same category articles
  • Attribute names differ (e.g., date of birth vs. birthdate)
  • Templates are restricted to a single category, making it harder to find a template for an article that belongs to multiple categories (e.g., actor and politician)
  • Templates are free form in nature and no integrity check is performed on whether the value filled by the user is of appropriate type for the given attribute

Infoboxer creates dynamic and semantic templates by suggesting attributes common for similar articles and controlling the expected values semantically. We will give an overview of our approach and demonstrate how Infoboxer can be used to create infoboxes for new Wikipedia articles as well as update erroneous values in existing infoboxes. We will also discuss our proposed extensions to the project.

Visit http://ebiq.org/p/668 for more information about Infoboxer. A demo can be found here.

Rafiki: A Semantic and Collaborative Approach to Community Health-Care in Underserved Areas

September 19th, 2014, by Tim Finin, posted in Mobile Computing, OWL, RDF, Semantic Web, Wearable Computing

rafike500

Primal Pappachan, Roberto Yus, Anupam Joshi and Tim Finin, Rafiki: A Semantic and Collaborative Approach to Community Health-Care in Underserved Areas, 10th IEEE International Conference on Collaborative Computing: Networking, Applications and Worksharing, 22-15 October2014, Miami.

Community Health Workers (CHWs) act as liaisons between health-care providers and patients in underserved or un-served areas. However, the lack of information sharing and training support impedes the effectiveness of CHWs and their ability to correctly diagnose patients. In this paper, we propose and describe a system for mobile and wearable computing devices called Rafiki which assists CHWs in decision making and facilitates collaboration among them. Rafiki can infer possible diseases and treatments by representing the diseases, their symptoms, and patient context in OWL ontologies and by reasoning over this model. The use of semantic representation of data makes it easier to share knowledge related to disease, symptom, diagnosis guidelines, and patient demography, between various personnel involved in health-care (e.g., CHWs, patients, health-care providers). We describe the Rafiki system with the help of a motivating community health-care scenario and present an Android prototype for smart phones and Google Glass.

Taming Wild Big Data

September 17th, 2014, by Tim Finin, posted in Database, Datamining, Machine Learning, RDF, Semantic Web

Jennifer Sleeman and Tim Finin, Taming Wild Big Data, AAAI Fall Symposium on Natural Language Access to Big Data, Nov. 2014.

Wild Big Data is data that is hard to extract, understand, and use due to its heterogeneous nature and volume. It typically comes without a schema, is obtained from multiple sources and provides a challenge for information extraction and integration. We describe a way to subduing Wild Big Data that uses techniques and resources that are popular for processing natural language text. The approach is applicable to data that is presented as a graph of objects and relations between them and to tabular data that can be transformed into such a graph. We start by applying topic models to contextualize the data and then use the results to identify the potential types of the graph’s nodes by mapping them to known types found in large open ontologies such as Freebase, and DBpedia. The results allow us to assemble coarse clusters of objects that can then be used to interpret the link and perform entity disambiguation and record linking.

Rapalytics! Where Rap Meets Data Science

September 14th, 2014, by Tim Finin, posted in Machine Learning, NLP

UMBC Ebiquity Research Meeting

Rapalytics! Where Rap Meets Data Science

Abhay Kashyap

10:00am Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014, ITE 346

For the Hip-Hop Fans: Remember the times when you had those long arguments with your friends about who the better rapper is? Remember how it always ended up in a stalemate because there was no evidence to back your argument? Well, look no further! Rapalytics is a one-stop site dedicated to extracting and presenting all the important analytics from Rap lyrics that separate a good rapper from a great one!

For the Data Science Nerds: Remember how indestructible your trained NLP tools were? Want to see how they act under pressure from text they have never seen before? Come take a look at how traditional NLP tools fair against text as complex as Rap and explore opportunities to design and build systems that handle much more than well-formed English text.

Kelvin: Extracting Knowledge from Large Text Collections

September 8th, 2014, by Tim Finin, posted in NLP

Preprint: James Mayfield, Paul McNamee, Craig Harman, Tim Finin and Dawn Lawrie, KELVIN: Extracting Knowledge from Large Text Collections, AAAI Fall Symposium on Natural Language Access to Big Data, 2014.

We describe the \kelvin system for extracting entities and relations from large text collections and its use in the TAC Knowledge Base Population Cold Start task run by the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology. The Cold Start task starts with an empty knowledge based defined by an ontology or entity types, properties and relations. Evaluations in 2012 and 2013 were done using a collection of text from local Web and news to de-emphasize the linking entities to a background knowledge bases such as Wikipedia. Interesting features of \kelvin include a cross-document entity coreference module based on entity mentions, removal of suspect intra-document conference chains, a slot value consolidator for entities, the application of inference rules to expand the number of asserted facts and a set of analysis and browsing tools supporting development.

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