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2016 December

Archive for December, 2016

Large Scale Cross Domain Temporal Topic Modeling for Climate Change Research

December 23rd, 2016, by Tim Finin, posted in Big data, Machine Learning, NLP

Jennifer Sleeman, Milton Halem, Tim Finin, Mark Cane, Advanced Large Scale Cross Domain Temporal Topic Modeling Algorithms to Infer the Influence of Recent Research on IPCC Assessment Reports (poster), American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2016, American Geophysical Union, December 2016.

One way of understanding the evolution of science within a particular scientific discipline is by studying the temporal influences that research publications had on that discipline. We provide a methodology for conducting such an analysis by employing cross-domain topic modeling and local cluster mappings of those publications with the historical texts to understand exactly when and how they influenced the discipline. We apply our method to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Reports and the citations therein. The IPCC reports were compiled by thousands of Earth scientists and the assessments were issued approximately every five years over a 30 year span, and includes over 200,000 research papers cited by these scientists.

PhD Proposal: Understanding the Logical and Semantic Structure of Large Documents

December 9th, 2016, by Tim Finin, posted in Machine Learning, NLP, NLP, Ontologies

business documents

Dissertation Proposal

Understanding the Logical and Semantic
Structure of Large Documents 

Muhammad Mahbubur Rahman

11:00-1:00 Monday, 12 December 2016, ITE325b, UMBC

Up-to-the-minute language understanding approaches are mostly focused on small documents such as newswire articles, blog posts, product reviews and discussion forum entries. Understanding and extracting information from large documents such as legal documents, reports, business opportunities, proposals and technical manuals is still a challenging task. The reason behind this challenge is that the documents may be multi-themed, complex and cover diverse topics.

We aim to automatically identify and classify a document’s sections and subsections, infer their structure and annotate them with semantic labels to understand the semantic structure of a document. This document’s structure understanding will significantly benefit and inform a variety of applications such as information extraction and retrieval, document categorization and clustering, document summarization, fact and relation extraction, text analysis and question answering.

Committee: Drs. Tim Finin (Chair), Anupam Joshi, Tim Oates, Cynthia Matuszek, James Mayfield (JHU)

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