UMBC ebiquity
2017 October

Archive for October, 2017

W3C Recommendation: Time Ontology in OWL

October 26th, 2017, by Tim Finin, posted in KR, Ontologies, OWL, Semantic Web

W3C Recommendation: Time Ontology in OWL

The Spatial Data on the Web Working Group has published a W3C Recommendation of the Time Ontology in OWL specification. The ontology provides a vocabulary for expressing facts about  relations among instants and intervals, together with information about durations, and about temporal position including date-time information. Time positions and durations may be expressed using either the conventional Gregorian calendar and clock, or using another temporal reference system such as Unix-time, geologic time, or different calendars.

Arya Renjan: Multi-observable Session Reputation Scoring System

October 22nd, 2017, by Tim Finin, posted in AI, cybersecurity, Data Science, Ebiquity, Machine Learning, meetings, talks

Multi-observable Session Reputation Scoring System

Arya Renjan

11:00-12:00 Monday, 23 October 2017, ITE 346

With increasing adoption of Cloud Computing, cyber attacks have become one of the most effective means for adversaries to inflict damage. To overcome limitations of existing blacklists and whitelists, our research focuses to develop a dynamic reputation scoring model for sessions based on a variety of observable and derived attributes of network traffic. Here we propose a technique to greylist sessions using observables like IP, Domain, URL and File Hash by scoring them numerically based on the events in the session. This enables automatic labeling of possible malicious hosts or users that can help in enriching the existing whitelists or blacklists.

Agniva Banerjee on Managing Privacy Policies through Blockchain

October 16th, 2017, by Tim Finin, posted in Blockchain, cybersecurity, Policy, Privacy, Security, Semantic Web

Link before you Share: Managing Privacy Policies through Blockchain

Agniva Banerjee

11:00am Monday, 16 October 2017

An automated access-control and audit mechanism that enforces users’ data privacy policies when sharing their data across third parties, by utilizing privacy policy ontology instances with the properties of blockchain.

talk: Penetration Testing a Simulated Automotive Ethernet Environment

October 15th, 2017, by Tim Finin, posted in cybersecurity, Security

Penetration Testing a Simulated Automotive Ethernet Environment

Kenneth Truex

11:00am Monday, 9 October 2017, ITE 346

The capabilities of modern day automobiles have far exceeded what Robert Bosch GmbH could have imagined when it proposed the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus back in 1986. Over time, drivers wanted more functionality, comfort, and safety in their automobiles creating a burden for automotive manufacturers. With these driver demands came many innovations to the in-vehicle network core protocol. Modern automobiles that have a video based infotainment system or any type of camera assisted functionality such as an Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) use ethernet as their network backbone. This is because the original CAN specification only allowed for up to eight bytes of data per message on a bus rated at 1 Mbps. This is far less than the requirements of more advanced video-based automotive systems. The ethernet protocol allows for 1500 bytes of data per packet on a network rated for up to 100 Mbps. This led the automotive industry to adopt ethernet as the core protocol, overcoming most of the limitations posed by the CAN protocol. By adopting ethernet as the protocol for automotive networks, certain attack vectors are now available for black hat hackers to exploit in order to put the vehicle in an unsafe condition. This thesis will create a simulated automotive ethernet environment using the CANoe network simulation platform created by Vector. Then, a penetration test will be conducted on the simulated environment in order to discover attacks that pose a threat to automotive ethernet networks. These attacks will be from the perspective of an attacker will full access to the vehicle under test, and will cover all three sides of the Confidentiality, Integrity, Availability (CIA) triad. In conclusion, this thesis will propose several ethernet specific defense mechanisms that can be implemented in an automotive taxonomy to reduce the attack surface and allow for a safer end user experience.

talk: K. Mayes on Attacks on Smart Cards, RFIDs and Embedded System, 10am 10/10

October 8th, 2017, by Tim Finin, posted in cybersecurity, Mobile Computing, Pervasive Computing, RFID, Security

Attacks on Smart Cards, RFIDs and Embedded Systems

Prof. Keith Mayes
Royal Holloway University of London

10-11:00am Tuesday, 10 October 2017, ITE 325, UMBC

Smart Cards and RFIDs exist with a range of capabilities and are used in their billions throughout the world. The simpler devices have poor security, however, for many years, high-end smart cards have successfully been used in a range of systems such as banking, passports, mobile communication, satellite TV etc. Fundamental to their success is a specialist design to offer remarkable resistance to a wide range of attacks, including physical, side-channel and fault. This talk describes a range of known attacks and the countermeasures that are employed to defeat them.

Prof. Keith Mayes is the Head of the School of Mathematics and Information Security at Royal Holloway University of London. He received his BSc (Hons) in Electronic Engineering in 1983 from the University of Bath, and his PhD degree in Digital Image Processing in 1987. He is an active researcher/author with 100+ publications in numerous conferences, books and journals. His interests include the design of secure protocols, communications architectures and security tokens as well as associated attacks/countermeasures. He is a Fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology, a Founder Associate Member of the Institute of Information Security Professionals, a Member of the Licensing Executives Society and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronic Commerce Research (JTAER).

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