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new paper: Discovering Scientific Influence using Cross-Domain Dynamic Topic Modeling

new paper: Discovering Scientific Influence using Cross-Domain Dynamic Topic Modeling

Tim Finin, 10:16am 17 November 2017

Discovering Scientific Influence using Cross-Domain Dynamic Topic Modeling

Jennifer Sleeman, Milton Halem, Tim Finin and Mark Cane, Discovering Scientific Influence using Cross-Domain Dynamic Topic Modeling, International Conference on Big Data, IEEE, December 2017.

We describe an approach using dynamic topic modeling to model influence and predict future trends in a scientific discipline. Our study focuses on climate change and uses assessment reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the papers they cite. Since 1990, an IPCC report has been published every five years that includes four separate volumes, each of which has many chapters. Each report cites tens of thousands of research papers, which comprise a correlated dataset of temporally grounded documents. We use a custom dynamic topic modeling algorithm to generate topics for both datasets and apply crossdomain analytics to identify the correlations between the IPCC chapters and their cited documents. The approach reveals both the influence of the cited research on the reports and how previous research citations have evolved over time. For the IPCC use case, the report topic model used 410 documents and a vocabulary of 5911 terms while the citations topic model was based on 200K research papers and a vocabulary more than 25K terms. We show that our approach can predict the importance of its extracted topics on future IPCC assessments through the use of cross domain correlations, Jensen-Shannon divergences and cluster analytics.


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