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MS defense: Internal Penetration Test of a Simulated Automotive Ethernet Environment, 11/21

November 18th, 2017, by Tim Finin, posted in cybersecurity, Data Science, Security

M.S. Thesis Defense

Internal Penetration Test of a Simulated Automotive Ethernet Environment

Kenneth Owen Truex

11:15 Tuesday, 21 November 2017, ITE325, UMBC

The capabilities of modern day automobiles have far exceeded what Robert Bosch GmbH could have imagined when it proposed the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus back in 1986. Over time, drivers wanted more functionality, comfort, and safety in their automobiles — creating a burden for automotive manufacturers. With these driver demands came many innovations to the in-vehicle network core protocol. Modern automobiles that have a video based infotainment system or any type of camera assisted functionality such as an Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) use ethernet as their network backbone. This is because the original CAN specification only allowed for up to 8 bytes of data per message on a bus rated at 1 Mbps. This is far less than the requirements of more advanced video-based automotive systems. The ethernet protocol allows for 1500 bytes of data per packet on a network rated for up to 100 Mbps. This led the automotive industry to adopt ethernet as the core protocol, overcoming most of the limitations posed by the CAN protocol. By adopting ethernet as the protocol for automotive networks, certain attack vectors are now available for black hat hackers to exploit in order to put the vehicle in an unsafe condition. I will create a simulated automotive ethernet environment using the CANoe network simulation platform by Vector GmbH. Then, a penetration test will be conducted on the simulated environment in order to discover attacks that pose a threat to automotive ethernet networks. These attacks will strictly follow a comprehensive threat model in order to narrowly focus the attack surface. If exploited successfully, these attacks will cover all three sides of the Confidentiality, Integrity, Availability (CIA) triad.

I will then propose a new and innovative mitigation strategy that can be implemented on current industry standard ECUs and run successfully under strict time and resource limitations. This new strategy can help to limit the attack surface that exists on modern day automobiles and help to protect the vehicle and its occupants from malicious adversaries.

Committee: Drs. Anupam Joshi (chair), Richard Forno, Charles Nicholas, Nilanjan Banerjee

Agniva Banerjee on Managing Privacy Policies through Blockchain

October 16th, 2017, by Tim Finin, posted in Blockchain, cybersecurity, Policy, Privacy, Security, Semantic Web

Link before you Share: Managing Privacy Policies through Blockchain

Agniva Banerjee

11:00am Monday, 16 October 2017

An automated access-control and audit mechanism that enforces users’ data privacy policies when sharing their data across third parties, by utilizing privacy policy ontology instances with the properties of blockchain.

talk: Penetration Testing a Simulated Automotive Ethernet Environment

October 15th, 2017, by Tim Finin, posted in cybersecurity, Security

Penetration Testing a Simulated Automotive Ethernet Environment

Kenneth Truex

11:00am Monday, 9 October 2017, ITE 346

The capabilities of modern day automobiles have far exceeded what Robert Bosch GmbH could have imagined when it proposed the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus back in 1986. Over time, drivers wanted more functionality, comfort, and safety in their automobiles creating a burden for automotive manufacturers. With these driver demands came many innovations to the in-vehicle network core protocol. Modern automobiles that have a video based infotainment system or any type of camera assisted functionality such as an Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) use ethernet as their network backbone. This is because the original CAN specification only allowed for up to eight bytes of data per message on a bus rated at 1 Mbps. This is far less than the requirements of more advanced video-based automotive systems. The ethernet protocol allows for 1500 bytes of data per packet on a network rated for up to 100 Mbps. This led the automotive industry to adopt ethernet as the core protocol, overcoming most of the limitations posed by the CAN protocol. By adopting ethernet as the protocol for automotive networks, certain attack vectors are now available for black hat hackers to exploit in order to put the vehicle in an unsafe condition. This thesis will create a simulated automotive ethernet environment using the CANoe network simulation platform created by Vector. Then, a penetration test will be conducted on the simulated environment in order to discover attacks that pose a threat to automotive ethernet networks. These attacks will be from the perspective of an attacker will full access to the vehicle under test, and will cover all three sides of the Confidentiality, Integrity, Availability (CIA) triad. In conclusion, this thesis will propose several ethernet specific defense mechanisms that can be implemented in an automotive taxonomy to reduce the attack surface and allow for a safer end user experience.

talk: K. Mayes on Attacks on Smart Cards, RFIDs and Embedded System, 10am 10/10

October 8th, 2017, by Tim Finin, posted in cybersecurity, Mobile Computing, Pervasive Computing, RFID, Security

Attacks on Smart Cards, RFIDs and Embedded Systems

Prof. Keith Mayes
Royal Holloway University of London

10-11:00am Tuesday, 10 October 2017, ITE 325, UMBC

Smart Cards and RFIDs exist with a range of capabilities and are used in their billions throughout the world. The simpler devices have poor security, however, for many years, high-end smart cards have successfully been used in a range of systems such as banking, passports, mobile communication, satellite TV etc. Fundamental to their success is a specialist design to offer remarkable resistance to a wide range of attacks, including physical, side-channel and fault. This talk describes a range of known attacks and the countermeasures that are employed to defeat them.

Prof. Keith Mayes is the Head of the School of Mathematics and Information Security at Royal Holloway University of London. He received his BSc (Hons) in Electronic Engineering in 1983 from the University of Bath, and his PhD degree in Digital Image Processing in 1987. He is an active researcher/author with 100+ publications in numerous conferences, books and journals. His interests include the design of secure protocols, communications architectures and security tokens as well as associated attacks/countermeasures. He is a Fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology, a Founder Associate Member of the Institute of Information Security Professionals, a Member of the Licensing Executives Society and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronic Commerce Research (JTAER).

DC-Area Anonymity, Privacy, and Security Seminar

June 10th, 2017, by Tim Finin, posted in cybersecurity, Privacy, Security

 

The DC-Area Anonymity, Privacy, and Security Seminar (DCAPS) is a seminar for research on computer and communications anonymity, privacy, and security in the D.C. area. DCAPS meets to promote collaboration and improve awareness of work in the community. Seminars occur three times a year. It meets at different locations and has been hosted in the past by George Mason University, Georgetown University, George Washington University, University of Maryland, College park and UMBC. DCAPS meetings are free and open to anybody interested. To join the seminar mailing list, contact the organizer, Aaron Johnson, at aaron.m.johnson AT nrl.navy.mil.

new paper: App behavioral analysis using system calls

March 14th, 2017, by Tim Finin, posted in Datamining, Machine Learning, Mobile Computing, Security

Prajit Kumar Das, Anupam Joshi and Tim Finin, App behavioral analysis using system calls, MobiSec: Security, Privacy, and Digital Forensics of Mobile Systems and Networks, IEEE Conference on Computer Communications Workshops, May 2017.

System calls provide an interface to the services made available by an operating system. As a result, any functionality provided by a software application eventually reduces to a set of fixed system calls. Since system calls have been used in literature, to analyze program behavior we made an assumption that analyzing the patterns in calls made by a mobile application would provide us insight into its behavior. In this paper, we present our preliminary study conducted with 534 mobile applications and the system calls made by them. Due to a rising trend of mobile applications providing multiple functionalities, our study concluded, mapping system calls to functional behavior of a mobile application was not straightforward. We use Weka tool and manually annotated application behavior classes and system call features in our experiments to show that using such features achieves mediocre F1-measure at best, for app behavior classification. Thus leading to the conclusion that system calls were not sufficient features for app behavior classification.

Context-Dependent Privacy and Security Management on Mobile Devices

February 27th, 2017, by Tim Finin, posted in Mobile Computing, Privacy, Security

Mobile devices and provide better services if then can model, recognize and adapt to their users' context.

Context-Dependent Privacy and Security Management on Mobile Devices

Prajit Das, UMBC

10:00am Tuesday, 27 February, 2017

Security and privacy of mobile devices is a challenging research domain. A prominent aspect of this research focuses on discovering software vulnerabilities for mobile operating systems and mobile apps. The other aspect of research focuses on user privacy and using feedback, generates privacy profiles for controlling data privacy. Profile based or role-based security can be restrictive as they require prior definition of such roles or profiles. As a result, it is better to use attribute-based access control and let the attributes define granularity of policy definition. This problem may thus be defined as, a security and privacy personalization problem. A critical issue in the process of capturing personalized policy is one of creating a system that is adaptive and knows when user’s preferences have been captured. Presented in this work you will learn about Mithril, a framework for capturing user access control policies that are fine-grained, context-sensitive and are represented using Semantic Web technologies and thereby manages access control decisions for user data on mobile devices. Violation metric has been used in this work as a measure to determine system state. A hierarchical context ontology has been used to define fine-grained access control policies and simplifying the process of policy modification for a user. A secondary goal of this research was to determine behavioral traits of mobile applications with a goal to detect outlier applications. Some preliminary research on this topic will also be discussed.

Managing Cloud Storage Obliviously

May 24th, 2016, by Tim Finin, posted in cloud computing, cybersecurity, Privacy, Security, Semantic Web

Vaishali Narkhede, Karuna Pande Joshi, Tim Finin, Seung Geol Choi, Adam Aviv and Daniel S. Roche, Managing Cloud Storage Obliviously, International Conference on Cloud Computing, IEEE Computer Society, June 2016.

Consumers want to ensure that their enterprise data is stored securely and obliviously on the cloud, such that the data objects or their access patterns are not revealed to anyone, including the cloud provider, in the public cloud environment. We have created a detailed ontology describing the oblivious cloud storage models and role based access controls that should be in place to manage this risk. We have developed an algorithm to store cloud data using oblivious data structure defined in this paper. We have also implemented the ObliviCloudManager application that allows users to manage their cloud data by validating it before storing it in an oblivious data structure. Our application uses role-based access control model and collection based document management to store and retrieve data efficiently. Cloud consumers can use our system to define policies for storing data obliviously and manage storage on untrusted cloud platforms even if they are unfamiliar with the underlying technology and concepts of oblivious data structures.

paper: OBD SecureAlert: An Anomaly Detection System for Vehicles

May 8th, 2016, by Tim Finin, posted in cybersecurity, Machine Learning, Security

 

Sandeep Nair, Sudip Mittal, and Anupam Joshi, OBD SecureAlert: An Anomaly Detection System for Vehicles, IEEE Workshop on Smart Service Systems (SmartSys 2016), 16 May 2016.

Vehicles can be considered as a specialized form of Cyber Physical Systems with sensors, ECU’s and actuators working together to produce a coherent behavior. With the advent of external connectivity, a larger attack surface has opened up which not only affects the passengers inside vehicles, but also people around them. One of the main causes of this increased attack surface is because of the advanced systems built on top of old and less secure common bus frameworks which lacks basic authentication mechanisms. To make such systems more secure, we approach this issue as a data analytic problem that can detect anomalous states. To accomplish that we collected data flowing between different components from real vehicles and using a Hidden Markov Model, we detect malicious behaviors and issue alerts, while a vehicle is in operation. Our evaluations using single parameter and two parameters together provide enough evidence that such techniques could be successfully used to detect anomalies in vehicles. Moreover our method could be used in new vehicles as well as older ones.

Policies For Oblivious Cloud Storage Using Semantic Web Technologies

April 3rd, 2016, by Tim Finin, posted in cybersecurity, Ontologies, OWL, RDF, Security, Semantic Web

Policies For Oblivious Cloud Storage
Using Semantic Web Technologies

Vaishali Narkhede
10:30am, Monday, 4 April 2016, ITE 346, UMBC

Consumers want to ensure that their enterprise data is stored securely and obliviously on the cloud, such that the data objects or their access patterns are not revealed to anyone, including the cloud provider, in the public cloud environment. We have created a detailed ontology describing the oblivious cloud storage models and role based access controls that should be in place to manage this risk. We have also implemented the ObliviCloudManager application that allows users to manage their cloud data using oblivious data structures. This application uses role based access control model and collection based document management to store and retrieve data efficiently. Cloud consumers can use our system to define policies for storing data obliviously and manage storage on untrusted cloud platforms, even if they are not familiar with the underlying technology and concepts of the oblivious data structure.

Down the rabbit hole: An Android system call study, 10:30am Mon 3/28

March 27th, 2016, by Tim Finin, posted in cybersecurity, Machine Learning, Mobile Computing, Security

Down the rabbit hole: An Android system call study

Prajit Kumar Das

10:30 am, Monday, March 28, 2016 ITE 346

App permissions and application sandboxing are the fundamental security mechanisms that protects user data on mobile platforms. We have worked on permission analytics before and come to a conclusion that just studying an app’s requested access rights (permissions) isn’t enough to understand potential data breaches. Techniques like privilege escalation have been previously used to gain further access to user and her data on mobile platforms like Android. Static code analysis and dynamic code execution may be studied to gather further insight into an app’s behavior. However, there is a need to study such a behavior at the lowest level of code execution and that is system calls. The system call is the fundamental interface between an application and the Linux kernel. In our current project, we are studying system calls made by apps for gathering a better understanding of their behavior.

Detecting Botnets Using a Collaborative Situational-Aware IDPS

February 17th, 2016, by Tim Finin, posted in Ontologies, Security, Semantic Web

M. Lisa Mathews, Anupam Joshi and Tim Finin, Detecting Botnets Using a Collaborative Situational-Aware IDPS, 2nd Int. Conf. on Information Systems Security and Privacy, Rome, IT, February 2016

Botnet attacks turn susceptible victim computers into bots that perform various malicious activities while under the control of a botmaster. Some examples of the damage they cause include denial of service, click fraud, spamware, and phishing. These attacks can vary in the type of architecture and communication protocol used, which might be modified during the botnet lifespan. Intrusion detection and prevention systems are one way to safeguard the cyber-physical systems we use, but they have difficulty detecting new or modified attacks, including botnets. Only known attacks whose signatures have been identified and stored in some form can be discovered by most of these systems. Also, traditional IDPSs are point-based solutions incapable of utilizing information from multiple data sources and have difficulty discovering new or more complex attacks. To address these issues, we are developing a semantic approach to intrusion detection that uses a variety of sensors collaboratively. Leveraging information from these heterogeneous sources leads to a more robust, situational-aware IDPS that is better equipped to detect complicated attacks such as botnets.

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