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Journal of Web Semantics

Journal of Web Semantics maintains high impact factor

July 6th, 2009, by Tim Finin, posted in AI, Semantic Web, Web

Journal of Web SemanticsThe latest Journal Citation Reports (2009) published by Thomson Reuters shows that the Journal of Web Semantics continues to enjoy a very high impact factor. The 2008 measure was 3.023, which was the 12th highest out of the 94 journals in the category of Computer Science, Artificial Intelligence.

Thomson Reuter’s journal impact factor is a measure of the frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year. The 2008 impact factor is computed as the citations received in 2008 to all articles published in 2006 and 2007, divided by the number of “source items” published in 2006 and 2007.

Journal of Web Semantics blog 2.0

November 11th, 2008, by Tim Finin, posted in Semantic Web

We’ve moved the Journal of Web Semantics blog from a self-hosted WordPress installation to Google-hosted blogger. We’ve moved the old posts (manually!) and the recommended public feed remains the same: http://feeds.feedburner.com/ jwsBlog.

Our move was motivated by a desire to make it easier for more people to contribute to the blog, a need to streamline the maintenance of the JWS infrastructure, and a goal to make the tools we use independent of the institutions of the current editors-in-chief.

When we started the ebiquity blog back in 2003 it was on blogger. After some months we moved to a self-hosted WordPress blog, which we continue to enjoy using for its flexibility, powerful features, and active community of developers and users.

I found it interesting to come back to blogger for the new JWS blog and to see what’s new and what has remained the same.

Journal of Web Semantics has high impact factor

June 25th, 2008, by Tim Finin, posted in GENERAL, Semantic Web

During the past year, the Journal of Web Semantics was added to the list of journals indexed by Thomson Reuters. Their most recent Journal Citation Report (2007) gives the JWS an impact factor of 3.41, which is the third highest out of the 92 titles in its category — Computer Science, Information Systems.

Thomson Reuter’s journal impact factor is a measure of the frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year. The 2007 impact factor is computed as the citations received in 2007 to all articles published in 2006 and 2005, divided by the number of “source items” published in 2006 and 2005.