paper: Automating GDPR Compliance using Policy Integrated Blockchain

May 30th, 2020

Automating GDPR Compliance using Policy Integrated Blockchain


Abhishek Mahindrakar and Karuna Pande Joshi, Automating GDPR Compliance using Policy Integrated Blockchain, 6th IEEE International Conference on Big Data Security on Cloud, May 2020.

Data protection regulations, like GDPR, mandate security controls to secure personally identifiable information (PII) of the users which they share with service providers. With the volume of shared data reaching exascale proportions, it is challenging to ensure GDPR compliance in real-time. We propose a novel approach that integrates GDPR ontology with blockchain to facilitate real-time automated data compliance. Our framework ensures data operation is allowed only when validated by data privacy policies in compliance with privacy rules in GDPR. When a valid transaction takes place the PII data is automatically stored off-chain in a database. Our system, built using Semantic Web and Ethereum Blockchain, includes an access control system that enforces data privacy policy when data is shared with third parties.


AAAI Symposium on Privacy-Enhancing AI and HLT Technologies

July 31st, 2018

PAL: Privacy-Enhancing AI and Language Technologies

AAAI Spring Symposium
25-27 March 2019, Stanford University

This symposium will bring together researchers in privacy and researchers in either artificial intelligence (AI) or human language technologies (HLTs), so that we may collectively assess the state of the art in this growing intersection of interests. Privacy remains an evolving and nuanced concern of computer users, as new technologies that use the web, smartphones, and the internet of things (IoT) collect a myriad of personal information. Rather than viewing AI and HLT as problems for privacy, the goal of this symposium is to “flip the script” and explore how AI and HLT can help meet users’ desires for privacy when interacting with computers.

It will focus on two loosely-defined research questions:

  • How can AI and HLT preserve or protect privacy in challenging situations?
  • How can AI and HLT help interested parties (e.g., computer users, companies, regulatory agencies) understand privacy in the status quo and what people want?

The symposium will consist of invited speakers, oral presentations of submitted papers, a poster session, and panel discussions. This event is a successor to Privacy and Language Technologies (“PLT”), a 2016 AAAI Fall Symposium. Submissions are due 2 November 2018.  For more information, see the symposium site.


paper: Attribute Based Encryption for Secure Access to Cloud Based EHR Systems

June 4th, 2018

Attribute Based Encryption for Secure Access to Cloud Based EHR Systems

Attribute Based Encryption for Secure Access to Cloud Based EHR Systems

Maithilee Joshi, Karuna Joshi and Tim Finin, Attribute Based Encryption for Secure Access to Cloud Based EHR Systems, IEEE International Conference on Cloud Computing, San Francisco CA, July 2018

 

Medical organizations find it challenging to adopt cloud-based electronic medical records services, due to the risk of data breaches and the resulting compromise of patient data. Existing authorization models follow a patient centric approach for EHR management where the responsibility of authorizing data access is handled at the patients’ end. This however creates a significant overhead for the patient who has to authorize every access of their health record. This is not practical given the multiple personnel involved in providing care and that at times the patient may not be in a state to provide this authorization. Hence there is a need of developing a proper authorization delegation mechanism for safe, secure and easy cloud-based EHR management. We have developed a novel, centralized, attribute based authorization mechanism that uses Attribute Based Encryption (ABE) and allows for delegated secure access of patient records. This mechanism transfers the service management overhead from the patient to the medical organization and allows easy delegation of cloud-based EHR’s access authority to the medical providers. In this paper, we describe this novel ABE approach as well as the prototype system that we have created to illustrate it.


Link Before You Share: Managing Privacy Policies through Blockchain

December 4th, 2017

Link Before You Share: Managing Privacy Policies through Blockchain

Agniva Banerjee, and Karuna Pande Joshi, Link Before You Share: Managing Privacy Policies through Blockchain, 4th International Workshop on Privacy and Security of Big Data (PSBD 2017), in conjunction with 2017 IEEE International Conference on Big Data, 4 December 2017.

With the advent of numerous online content providers, utilities and applications, each with their own specific version of privacy policies and its associated overhead, it is becoming increasingly difficult for concerned users to manage and track the confidential information that they share with the providers. We have developed a novel framework to automatically track details about how a user’s PII is stored, used and shared by the provider. We have integrated our data privacy ontology with the properties of blockchain, to develop an automated access-control and audit mechanism that enforces users’ data privacy policies when sharing their data across third parties. We have also validated this framework by implementing a working system LinkShare. In this paper, we describe our framework on detail along with the LinkShare system. Our approach can be adopted by big data users to automatically apply their privacy policy on data operations and track the flow of that data across various stakeholders.


Agniva Banerjee on Managing Privacy Policies through Blockchain

October 16th, 2017

Link before you Share: Managing Privacy Policies through Blockchain

Agniva Banerjee

11:00am Monday, 16 October 2017

An automated access-control and audit mechanism that enforces users’ data privacy policies when sharing their data across third parties, by utilizing privacy policy ontology instances with the properties of blockchain.


PhD defense: Prajit Das, Context-dependent privacy and security management on mobile devices

August 17th, 2017

Ph.D. Dissertation Defense

Context-dependent privacy and security management on mobile devices

Prajit Kumar Das

8:00-11:00am Tuesday, 22 August 2017, ITE325b, UMBC

There are ongoing security and privacy concerns regarding mobile platforms which are being used by a growing number of citizens. Security and privacy models typically used by mobile platforms use one-time permission acquisition mechanisms. However, modifying access rights after initial authorization in mobile systems is often too tedious and complicated for users. User studies show that a typical user does not understand permissions requested by applications or are too eager to use the applications to care to understand the permission implications. For example, the Brightest Flashlight application was reported to have logged precise locations and unique user identifiers, which have nothing to do with a flashlight application’s intended functionality, but more than 50 million users used a version of this application which would have forced them to allow this permission. Given the penetration of mobile devices into our lives, a fine-grained context-dependent security and privacy control approach needs to be created.

We have created Mithril as an end-to-end mobile access control framework that allows us to capture access control needs for specific users, by observing violations of known policies. The framework studies mobile application executables to better inform users of the risks associated with using certain applications. The policy capture process involves an iterative user feedback process that captures policy modifications required to mediate observed violations. Precision of policy is used to determine convergence of the policy capture process. Policy rules in the system are written using Semantic Web technologies and the Platys ontology to define a hierarchical notion of context. Policy rule antecedents are comprised of context elements derived using the Platys ontology employing a query engine, an inference mechanism and mobile sensors. We performed a user study that proves the feasibility of using our violation driven policy capture process to gather user-specific policy modifications.

We contribute to the static and dynamic study of mobile applications by defining “application behavior” as a possible way of understanding mobile applications and creating access control policies for them. Our user study also shows that unlike our behavior-based policy, a “deny by default” mechanism hampers usability of access control systems. We also show that inclusion of crowd-sourced policies leads to further reduction in user burden and need for engagement while capturing context-based access control policy. We enrich knowledge about mobile “application behavior” and expose this knowledge through the Mobipedia knowledge-base. We also extend context synthesis for semantic presence detection on mobile devices by combining Bluetooth, low energy beacons and Nearby Messaging services from Google.

Committee: Drs. Anupam Joshi (chair), Tim Finin (co-chair), Tim Oates, Nilanjan Banerjee, Arkady Zaslavsky, (CSIRO), Dipanjan Chakraborty (Shopperts)


DC-Area Anonymity, Privacy, and Security Seminar

June 10th, 2017

 

The DC-Area Anonymity, Privacy, and Security Seminar (DCAPS) is a seminar for research on computer and communications anonymity, privacy, and security in the D.C. area. DCAPS meets to promote collaboration and improve awareness of work in the community. Seminars occur three times a year. It meets at different locations and has been hosted in the past by George Mason University, Georgetown University, George Washington University, University of Maryland, College park and UMBC. DCAPS meetings are free and open to anybody interested. To join the seminar mailing list, contact the organizer, Aaron Johnson, at aaron.m.johnson AT nrl.navy.mil.


Context-Dependent Privacy and Security Management on Mobile Devices

February 27th, 2017

Mobile devices and provide better services if then can model, recognize and adapt to their users' context.

Context-Dependent Privacy and Security Management on Mobile Devices

Prajit Das, UMBC

10:00am Tuesday, 27 February, 2017

Security and privacy of mobile devices is a challenging research domain. A prominent aspect of this research focuses on discovering software vulnerabilities for mobile operating systems and mobile apps. The other aspect of research focuses on user privacy and using feedback, generates privacy profiles for controlling data privacy. Profile based or role-based security can be restrictive as they require prior definition of such roles or profiles. As a result, it is better to use attribute-based access control and let the attributes define granularity of policy definition. This problem may thus be defined as, a security and privacy personalization problem. A critical issue in the process of capturing personalized policy is one of creating a system that is adaptive and knows when user’s preferences have been captured. Presented in this work you will learn about Mithril, a framework for capturing user access control policies that are fine-grained, context-sensitive and are represented using Semantic Web technologies and thereby manages access control decisions for user data on mobile devices. Violation metric has been used in this work as a measure to determine system state. A hierarchical context ontology has been used to define fine-grained access control policies and simplifying the process of policy modification for a user. A secondary goal of this research was to determine behavioral traits of mobile applications with a goal to detect outlier applications. Some preliminary research on this topic will also be discussed.


Capturing policies for fine-grained access control on mobile devices

November 8th, 2016

In this week’s ebiquity meeting (11:30 8 Nov. 2016) Prajit Das will present his work on capturing policies for fine-grained access control on mobile devices.

As of 2016, there are more mobile devices than humans on earth. Today, mobile devices are a critical part of our lives and often hold sensitive corporate and personal data. As a result, they are a lucrative target for attackers, and managing data privacy and security on mobile devices has become a vital issue. Existing access control mechanisms in most devices are restrictive and inadequate. They do not take into account the context of a device and its user when making decisions. In many cases, the access granted to a subject should change based on context of a device. Such fine-grained, context-sensitive access control policies have to be personalized too. In this paper, we present the Mithril system, that uses policies represented in Semantic Web technologies and captured using user feedback, to handle access control on mobile devices. We present an iterative feedback process to capture user specific policy. We also present a policy violation metric that allows us to decide when the capture process is complete.

Managing Cloud Storage Obliviously

May 24th, 2016

Vaishali Narkhede, Karuna Pande Joshi, Tim Finin, Seung Geol Choi, Adam Aviv and Daniel S. Roche, Managing Cloud Storage Obliviously, International Conference on Cloud Computing, IEEE Computer Society, June 2016.

Consumers want to ensure that their enterprise data is stored securely and obliviously on the cloud, such that the data objects or their access patterns are not revealed to anyone, including the cloud provider, in the public cloud environment. We have created a detailed ontology describing the oblivious cloud storage models and role based access controls that should be in place to manage this risk. We have developed an algorithm to store cloud data using oblivious data structure defined in this paper. We have also implemented the ObliviCloudManager application that allows users to manage their cloud data by validating it before storing it in an oblivious data structure. Our application uses role-based access control model and collection based document management to store and retrieve data efficiently. Cloud consumers can use our system to define policies for storing data obliviously and manage storage on untrusted cloud platforms even if they are unfamiliar with the underlying technology and concepts of oblivious data structures.


talk: Is your personal data at risk? App analytics to the rescue

September 26th, 2015

Is your personal data at risk?
App analytics to the rescue

Prajit Kumar Das

10:30am Monday, 28 September 28 2015, ITE346

According to Virustotal, a prominent virus and malware tool, the Google Play Store has a few thousand apps from major malware families. Given such a revelation, access control systems for mobile data management, have reached a state of critical importance. We propose the development of a system which would help us detect the pathways using which user’s data is being stolen from their mobile devices. We use a multi layered approach which includes app meta data analysis, understanding code patterns and detecting and eventually controlling dynamic data flow when such an app is installed on a mobile device. In this presentation we focus on the first part of our work and discuss the merits and flaws of our unsupervised learning mechanism to detect possible malicious behavior from apps in the Google Play Store.


Access control for a triplestore linked data fragments interface

April 19th, 2015

In this week’s meeting (10-11am Tue, April 21), Ankur Padia will present work in progress on providing access control to an RDF triple store.

Triple store access control for a linked data fragments interface
Ankur Padia, UMBC

The maturation of Semantic Web standards and associated web-based data representations such as schema.org have made RDF a popular model for representing graph data and semi-structured knowledge. Triple stores are used to store and query an RDF dataset and often expose a SPARQL endpoint service on the Web for public access. Most existing SPARQL endpoints support very simple access control mechanisms if any at all, preventing their use for many applications where fine-grained privacy or data security is important. We describe new work on access control for a linked data fragments interface, i.e. one that accepts queries consisting one or more triple patterns and responds with all matching triples that the authenticated querier can access.